BMHC Garden Project

FPC Day at the Black Mountain Home Garden Project

The Black Mountain Home for Children, Youth and Families started a Garden Project in 2011 in an effort to increase gardening capacity at the Home. The goals of the project are to grow fresh vegetables for use at the Home, serve our neighbors in need through donations to local food pantries, and increase volunteers’ “sustainability skills” through gardening experience. On Saturday mornings, volunteers plant, water, cultivate, and pick any remaining produce that has not been harvested by the Home and donate it to local food banks. Volunteers are also invited to take produce for their personal use.

The garden is open for the season and will be open every Saturday from 9:00 – 11:00 am. First Presbyterian members and friends are invited to volunteer on FPC Day on April 28. You do not need to be an experienced gardener to help. Jane Laping (janelaping@sbcglobal.net or 277-7342) will be the garden supervisor that day and she will tell you what needs to be done and how to do it.

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GROW 2012 and Earth Care Week!

It’s almost Earth Day, which means it is close to the time we celebrate by drawing our focus onto creation. The Creation Care Team has a diverse array of activities to share this month. Find something that is right for you! You may use the form at the end of the article to sign up.

April 21     Join with the youth of our church to clean up litter of all sizes and shapes along the French Broad River

April 25    Our Wednesday night dinner will feature local foods prepared by our resident chef, Char Frellick.

April 28 9:00 – 11:00 am Come work in the Garden at the Black Mountain Home for Children

April 29  Our worship services will focus on Creation Care and we will gather for a hike after a potluck lunch. All ages are welcome to explore the forest and look at the wide variety of living things that God has put on earth.

* * * SIGN ME UP! * * *

SPROUT! March 24, 2012

March 24, 2012. 

We opened the Garden at the Black Mountain Home for Children earlier this year so that we could get in a spring planting. We were very fortunate to have 8 volunteers from Warren Wilson College to help us cut 3-foot widths of cardboard to lay between the rows in an attempt to conquer the massive weed problem we had last year.

We completed covering both sides of three 85-foot rows with cardboard, anchoring them with giant wire staples, and covering the edges with dirt so that the wind wouldn’t pick them up. We also planted one of the rows with three types of peas.

Before leaving the garden in God’s hands, we dedicated it to His glory and mercy. Lee, one of the garden leaders, did a very nice reflection and prayer on Genesis: We only plant the seeds; God is the one who makes them grow.

World Water Day 2012

What is International World Water Day???
“…designated as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. An international day to celebrate freshwater was recommended at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The United Nations General Assembly responded by designating 22 March 1993 as the first World Water Day. Each year, World Water Day highlights a specific aspect of freshwater.”

Consider for a moment the range of uses in our personal homes: brush teeth, wash face, shower, wash & rinse dishes, drinking, cooking, waste, landscape (garden, plants…), clean up spills…..wash car, clothes, run vehicles…it is everywhere. Now consider those uses times 7 billion people. Of course not all are using water in the same ways, but there are 7 billion people on earth who need to be fed and to whom water is important.

Prepare for March 22 by thinking of how you will focus on your water usage throughout the day. A list of ways you use water each day and how long you use it would help to identify areas to improve. Choose a focus that you can manage; maybe setting up a gray-water recycling station is too challenging, but reducing the time you shower is manageable.  Keep us posted here in the Earth Care Journal and share your experiences.

This video focuses on the water table with easy to understand information and animation. Click HERE to view.