Put It on The Line

SEPTEMBER JUST LIVING CHALLENGE

Now that fall is approaching and drier weather is ahead, September is a good month to try hanging your laundry up to dry. Drying your laundry outside instead of in a clothes dryer has advantages other than the obvious one of saving energy and reducing your electric or gas bill.

Clothing dried on a line lasts longer than if dried in a dryer because of less wear and tear on the fabric. (Where do you think all that dryer fluff comes from?) Laundry dried in the sun gets bleached naturally, is sanitized by the rays of the sun, and has a clean and natural smell without fragrances. The best part of hanging your laundry on a line is that it gets you outside on a beautiful day.

Source: Organic Gardening

If There’s Only One Thing You Can Do

Put your wet, just- laundered shirts on plastic hangers and find a place to hang them inside to dry. Hang them on the shower curtain rod, towel bars, an over the door hanger, or on a line in the basement or attic. You might even have a covered area outside where you could hook a few hangers.

Take Small Steps

Put up a line outside where it will be in the sun and find some clothespins. Start off by hanging a few selected items such as kitchen towels and cloth napkins and advance to underwear, t-shirts, shorts, and pants. If your towels are stiff after line-drying, put them into the dryer and run it on air fluff for a few minutes to soften them. Even if you don’t hang all of every wash load, you are reducing carbon emissions and helping to protect the environment every time you put it on the line.

Inner Simplicity

Doing part of your weekly chores outdoors makes it easier to enjoy God’s creation. While you are clipping laundry to the line, focus on something in nature – the sky, a butterfly, a plant – and allow your gratitude for what God has given us fill your soul. You will return to your other chores refreshed and with a gentler spirit.

Outer Simplicity

A clothes dryer consumes about 6% of the energy use in the home. By reducing the number of loads or the size of the loads, you will be using less electricity or gas which means fewer fossil fuels extracted and burned and less air pollution. Using your dryer less also translates into fewer dryer sheets needed and longer lasting clothing and linens. Each of these results has a positive effect on our air, land and water and if enough people change to line drying, can improve lives across the globe.

Harvest Help Needed!

It did not rain at the Home Grown Garden last Saturday morning and four volunteers harvested more than 60 pounds of produce. We picked 40 pounds of tomatoes, 15 pounds of green beans, assorted peppers, a big bunch of carrots, two fennel bulbs, a few squash, and fewer giant okra. We donated the vegetables to Manna.

The beans on the trellis and the bush beans looked great although the leaves are still being eaten by bugs. We decided that there were enough beans to share with the rabbits and didn’t worry about stopping them. We had no time to do anything else except pick a few weeds, so there will be plenty to do this Saturday.

This is harvesting time and we will have more beans to pick, some tomatoes, peppers, summer squash, and a few surprises. The corn does not look good and may be a total loss this year. All the rain has challenged us in new and different ways.

Please come to help us harvest this Saturday from 9:00 – 11:00 am. If you have never picked beans or squash we will show you how. Volunteers are welcome to take some of the produce for their personal use.

Bring drinking water; no sunscreen needed!    Reminder: There is no bathroom at the garden.

Directions to the Home Grown Garden at Black Mountain Home

From Asheville, take I-40 East to Exit 59, Swannanoa. Turn left at the traffic light, and then right at the next light onto Highway 70. At the next traffic light turn left onto Whitson Ave and then right at the stop sign onto Old US 70. Follow this road for almost 2 miles to the next traffic light. Turn left onto Lake Eden Road. Look for the Garden sign before you get to the main entrance of the Home and turn right into the lower fields area near the stone silo.

Home Grown Garden

The beans are coming in, the tomatoes are ripening, and the squash is starting to produce so now is the time to see the fruits of our labors. Come to the Home Grown Garden this Saturday from 9:00 – 11:00 am and pick a little, prune a little, weed a little, and enjoy the setting of this giving garden in the glorious splendor of God’s creation. Check out His creatures, too. The Home has goats, donkeys, and chickens in a large pen right next to the Garden.

All ages are welcome and you don’t have to be an experienced gardener to help. Garden supervisors will show you what to do and how to do it. There might even be a few beans for you to take home and taste the goodness of freshly picked produce.

Bring drinking water and a hat and sunscreen – unless it is raining! Reminder: There is no bathroom at the garden.

 

Directions to the Home Grown Garden at Black Mountain Home

From Asheville, take I-40 East to Exit 59, Swannanoa. Turn left at the traffic light, and then right at the next light onto Highway 70. At the next traffic light turn left onto Whitson Ave and then right at the stop sign onto Old US 70. Follow this road for almost 2 miles to the next traffic light. Turn left onto Lake Eden Road. Look for the Garden sign before you get to the main entrance of the Home and turn right into the lower fields area near the stone silo.

 

 

Home Grown Garden- This Saturday 8.3.13

Despite all the rain and lack of sun, our crops at the Home Grown Garden are growing – although slowly. The tomatoes are starting to ripen, the beans are flowering and making beans, the squash has big yellow flowers, the okra flowers are stunning, and the row of wildflowers will catch your eye! Carrots, beets, onions, and basil are ready for picking and cucumbers need to be trained to climb the trellis.

In addition to picking, weeding and hoeing, we need to move our compost pile this weekend. The small amount of wood chips that are left could also be gathered and spread in a more convenient location for our picnic table.

The weather should be dry this weekend, so why not plan right now to join us from 9-11 am on Saturday. Bring drinking water and a hat and sunscreen. We have everything else you will need including leaders who will show you what to do.

Directions to the Home Grown Garden at Black Mountain Home

From Asheville, take I-40 East to Exit 59, Swannanoa. Turn left at the traffic light, and then right at the next light onto Highway 70. At the next traffic light turn left onto Whitson Ave and then right at the stop sign onto Old US 70. Follow this road for almost 2 miles to the next traffic light. Turn left onto Lake Eden Road. Look for the Garden sign before you get to the main entrance of the Home and turn right into the lower fields area near the stone silo.

Reminder: There is no bathroom at the garden.

AUGUST CHALLENGE!!!

Americans love their coffee. We consume 400 million cups of coffee per day or 146 billion cups of coffee per year. If you buy just one cup of coffee or tea per day in a disposable cup, you will generate 23 pounds of waste in a year. Reusable cups have a greater initial environmental impact than polystyrene or paper cups, but that impact lessens over time as the cup is reused. On average, a ceramic cup lasts for 2000 uses before it breaks or is discarded.

If there is only one thing you can do: Replace paper or polystyrene cups with a reusable mug when at home, at your workplace, or in your car. Carry one in your bag so you have one wherever you go.

Take small steps: Take a reusable mug with you when you buy coffee. Ask the waiter/waitress if they give a discount for bringing your own mug. Keep track of which places give a discount and how much you save and report back to Ellen Davisellen82864@gmail.com.

Inner simplicity: You can do your part to lessen your impact on God’s creation even if you can’t do it for other people. Switching to a reusable mug may not seem like it could make a big difference, but just by carrying one you may prompt others to think about the number of cups Americans throw away after just one use.

Outer simplicity: Our Creator gave us limited resources and expects us to use them wisely. Traveling with a reusable mug is a better choice than a one-use cup in terms of litter on the land and in our water, water and air pollution, disposal in landfills, and use of trees for paper. These impacts affect not just the disposable cup users, but all of God’s people living on the planet.