Recap Sept. & Oct. Events

Climate Scientist Speaks about Moral Obligation

Monday, September 29 at 7:00 PM, in St. Eugene’s Catholic Church Social Hall, 72 Culvern St, which is just past Asheville Catholic School on Beaverdam Road.

 

Climate scientist, Deke Arndt, of the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville has been a co-editor for NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and has been instrumental in drafting the government’s annual climate report. As a result of his findings, he has had a personal revelation in terms of our moral obligation concerning our changing climate.

 

Fracking Rule Comments due September 30

 

In its last session, the NC General Assembly lifted the moratorium on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) for hard to access natural gas deposits, and it is now legal to frack in the state. The Mining and Energy Commission has proposed rules for how fracking will be conducted and is accepting comments until September 30. Identify yourself as a person of faith and make your voice heard to protect God’s Creation from destructive fracking practices.  You can make your comments  on-line or sign a letter on-line to the Mining and Energy Commission.

 

Local Food and Faith Potluck

Monday, October 6, from 6:00 – 8:00 PM at Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church, 789 Merrimon Avenue

 

The Creation Care Alliance of Western North Carolina invites you to a Local Food & Faith Potluck to share a homegrown meal together and reflect on the relationship between food, faith, and creation care. There will be time for socializing and networking, giving thanks for the gift of creation that sustains us, and discussing ideas for the Creation Care Alliance of Western North Carolina’s programming and next steps. Wake Forest Master of Divinity student, Caleb Pusey, will lead us in a local food, faith, and climate change reflection. In keeping with the theme, a dish made with local ingredients is preferable but not required.

Climate Scientist Speaks about Moral Obligation

Climate scientist, Deke Arndt, of the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville will speak on Monday, September 29 at 7:00 PM, in St. Eugene’s Catholic Church Social Hall.  For the last several years, Deke has been a co-editor for NOAA
(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and has been instrumental in drafting the government’s annual climate report. As a result of his findings, he has had a personal revelation in terms of our moral obligation concerning our changing climate. Deke is an interesting speaker and his message is very important for the well-being of our world and our families. Children 12 or older are welcome to the talk. Child care is available for little ones. Simultaneous interpretation to the Spanish speaking community will be provided. St. Eugene’s Catholic Church is at 72 Culvern St, which is just past Asheville Catholic School on Beaverdam Road.

October Advocacy

Food and Faith Potluck in October

The Creation Care Alliance of Western North Carolina invites you to a Local Food & Faith Potluck on Monday, October 6, from 6:00 – 8:00 PM to share a homegrown meal together and reflect on the relationship between food, faith, and creation care. In keeping with the theme, a dish made with local ingredients is preferable but not required. This event will be hosted at Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church, 789 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville.

Advocacy: Witnessing for God’s Creation  New Fracking Rules

In its last session, the NC General Assembly lifted the moratorium on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) for hard to access natural gas deposits, and now it is legal to frack in the state. The Mining and Energy Commission has proposed rules for how fracking will be conducted and is accepting comments until September 30. Identify yourself as a person of faith and make your voice heard to protect God’s Creation from destructive fracking practices.  You can make your comments  on-line or sign a letter on-line to the Mining and Energy Commission.

Advocacy: Witnessing for God’s Creation  New Carbon Emissions Limits for Power Plants

Fossil fuel–fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to climate change and the EPA has proposed new carbon emission limits for existing power plants. On October 5, look for a Creation Care Team member with a clipboard and sign a letter to Administrator McCarthy supporting carbon pollution limits for existing power plants and help protect God’s Creation.

Compost Demo

If you have ever wondered how to make compost, come to the Home Grown Garden this Saturday, September 28 at 10:00 am to learn how. Master Gardeners, Len and Esther Pardue, will give a 30 minute demonstration on building and maintaining a compost pile, and will provide you with a handout and answer your questions. Fall is the perfect time to start a compost pile when there is an abundance of leaves and there are still grass clippings from your yard.

The rain last Saturday put us behind on our garden chores, so come at 9:00 am and stay until 11:00 am to help pick the few remaining vegetables, protect the irrigation system with cardboard and wood chips, and spread manure on the planting rows. We will need help through the end of October to get the garden ready for the winter.

 

Directions to the Home Grown Garden at the Black Mountain Home for Children, Youth and Families

From Asheville, take I-40 East to Exit 59, Swannanoa. Turn left at the traffic light, and then right at the next light onto Highway 70. At the next traffic light turn left onto Whitson Ave and then right at the stop sign onto Old US 70. Follow this road for almost 2 miles to the next traffic light. Turn left onto Lake Eden Road. Look for the Garden sign before you get to the main entrance of the Home and turn right into the lower fields area near the stone silo.

Reminder: There are no restrooms at the garden.

 

 

Just Living Monthly Challenge : Bee Aware

There are many types of bees and wasps but honeybees alone are responsible for providing us with at least 1/3 of our food supply. A few years ago beekeepers started noticing an alarming number of their bees mysteriously dying and their hives disappearing. After much research, scientists now believe that Colony Collapse Disorder is caused by several factors coming together. One main culprit is pesticides. Some newer pesticides bred into the crop seeds are killing bees directly or more insidiously by weakening their navigation and/or immune systems, thus making them more susceptible to parasites and disease. 

If There’s Only One Thing You Can Do it is SAVE BEES.

1. When planting new plants ask the nursery to make sure they are not pre-treated with pesticides and tell them to contact corporate headquarters about your request.

2. Reduce the amount of pesticides and herbicides you use and encourage your friends and family too.

3. Buy organic to support farmers that are trying to make us healthier which happens to help the bees at the same time.

4. Learn the difference between bees and wasps so you don’t accidentally kill our little pollinating friends. Bees are oval shaped and hairy with flat hairy legs for gathering pollen. Wasps, yellow jackets and hornets are smoother with a slender waist between the thorax and abdomen.

5. If you find a displaced hive or swarm of honeybees. Don’t kill them. Call your government extension agent and they will put you in touch with a local beekeeper who will gladly come get the free bees!

Take Small Steps

Buying local honey supports beekeepers and reduces the unhealthy practices of large honey producers. Beekeeping practices of large food companies require millions of hives (each hive contains 50,000 or more bees) to be transported to pollinate crops and make honey.  Moving the hives back and forth across the country to pollinate certain crops at certain times stresses the bees and deprives them of a diverse diet, thus weakening them further.

Inner Simplicity

Learning about bees and what is killing them makes you a more informed consumer—they are vital to the complex web of creation of which we are also a part.

Outer Simplicity

Bees are an important link in the food chain all over the world. Interrupting the role that bees play as pollinators can have devastating consequences to our global food supply. As Christians, we are called to be conscious of how our actions affect all of our neighbors, bees included.